Aux Quatre Vents
This was the venue for our first meal and for our last meal. Twice, in a three day trip. As adventurous as we are with our eating, we were worried nothing might live up to this experience, and we had to leave Alsace with memories of Aux Quatre Vents. Everything we ate here was perfect. From the foie gras with fig bread and to the girolles (mushrooms) and escargot (snails). But the dish that’s etched in my memory is the Cerises Poêlée (pan fried cherries) that I can’t wait to replicate at home. Caramelised cherries with a bit of strawberry jam, this was summer’s best in my plate. It was served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and whipped cream.

Brasserie Fischer
The Fischer brewery is long gone, but its brasserie still remains. We all shared the Alsatian specialty, flammekueche, also knows as tart flambée. The dough is rolled super thin then topped with creme fraiche, onions and lardons (bacon), and then baked. It was crispy and singed at the edges. I got the choucroute garnie (lots of meat piled on top of some sauerkraut), another Alsatian specialty (turns out, my favourite choucroute stop in Paris, Le Roi du Saucisson is better). Arjun ordered three massive meatballs with spätzle (fried pasta). Hearty portions, but I only wish they served local desserts.

L’Epicerie
A really cool afternoon snack stop where they only serve tartines. I went for the rillettes de canard tartine (fatty, slow-cooked shredded duck) and Arjun took the roast beef tartine. If Franchi weren’t around the corner I would have ordered the apricot tartines with almonds and thick cream.

Galler
Chocolate shop also serving excellent ice cream and to Arjun’s delight also serving thick milkshakes.  It’s right around the corner from Franchi and worth seeking out to get your second scoop.

Pâtisserie Koenig
This one’s quite nice – try the local specialty, Langhopf, here. It’s a rich bread made with hazelnuts, almonds, walnuts, cinnamon and raisins.

Au Pain de Mon Grand Père
The name of this boulangerie translates to “the bread of my grand father”, and with a name like that it’s hard not to want to visit this place. I was excited to find bread made with Einkorn (ancient wheat grain) and we bought half of a couronne d’epeautre. It was a very good bread – dense and slightly chewy. Although, if I didn’t know it weren’t regular wheat, I won’t be able to tell the difference. Like Chad Robertson says, it’s a bit like eating different tomatoes. The boulangerie has 4 more locations listed on their website.

Les Mains Dans la Farine
We stumbled upon this bakery as we walked up Rue d’Austerlitz after having a little picnic at Place d’Austerlitz. The kugelhopf was a lot like eating a raisin studded brioche – quite unlike our regular syrup soaked kugelhopf at Maison Landemaine in Paris.

Kugelhopf

La Cloche à Fromage
Cheese shop to get your Munster fix. Several locations listed on their website. Pictured below is a perfectly ripe goat cheese